Tag Archives: researchers

Getting Things Done for Researchers

I shall be presenting a workshop on Getting Things Done for Researchers as part of the University of Salford doctoral programme on 8 February 2012.


The Salford Postgraduate Research Training Programme (SPoRT)
Getting Things Done for Researchers
Dr Pascal Venier
School of Humanities, Languages and Social Sciences
Wednesday 8 February 2012, 13:00-16:00

The aims of this session are twofold:

  • Firstly, to introduce participants to the Getting Things Done method developed by Davis Allen, which unlike traditional time management methods, focuses on managing workflows rather than time (1).
  • And secondly to help participants start developing their own effective personal workflow system.

This session will introduce the principles of the Getting Things Done methodology. It will focuses particularly on :

  • the five phases of mastering one’s own workflow seamlessly (Collect, Process, Organise, Review and Do)
  • the weekly review
  • and the 6 levels approach to setting priorities (current actions, current projects, areas of responsibility and focus, short, middle and long term goals and visions)

Participants will also have the opportunity to reflect on their current workflows and what their own existing commitments and priorities are and should be.

(1) David Allen, Getting Things Done: How to Achieve Stress-free Productivity (London: Piatkus Books, 2002). ISBN 978-0749922641.

Introduction to Mind Mapping workshop, 25 January 2012

I shall be presenting an Introduction to Mind-mapping and related techniques for researchers on the University of Salford doctoral programme on 25 January 2012.


The Salford Postgraduate Research Training Programme (SPoRT)
Introduction to Mind Mapping
Dr Pascal Venier
School of Humanities, Languages and Social Sciences
25 January 2012 13:00-16:00

The aim of this session is to introduce participants to the principles and practice of the mapping of ideas and concepts. By the end of this session participants will have developed a basic awareness of Mind Mapping and related techniques (such as Concept Mapping, Idea Mapping, etc.) and their pertinence in research contexts.

This session will:

  • Introduce participants to the principles of orthodox mind mapping as defined by Tony Buzan, in Use Your Head (London: BBC, 1974), and later The Mind Map Book (London: BBC, 1993).
  • Give the opportunity to experiment with mind mapping techniques through a practical exercise.
  • Review other visual mapping techniques which have evolved from orthodox mind mapping (other forms of mind mapping, concept mapping, idea mapping, argument mapping).
  • Highlight the effectiveness of visual mapping techniques through the presentation of a number of examples of maps.
  • Show how researchers can fruitfully use a visual map as a thinking space, both individually and collaboratively.
  • Discuss the potential of visual mapping for remote collaboration, through web-based applications.
  • Provide a review of the most pertinent software available both as desktop applications and as online applications.

Introduction to Mind Mapping workshop, 16 February 2011

Update (6 February 2011): The workshop is now fully booked, which is very pleasing.

I shall be presenting an Introduction to Mind-mapping and related techniques for researchers on the University of Salford doctoral programme on 16 February 2011.


The Salford Postgraduate Research Training Programme (SPoRT)
Introduction to Mind-mapping and related techniques
Dr Pascal Venier, School of Languages
Wednesday 16 February 2011, 13:00-16:00

The aim of this session is to introduce participants to the principles and practice of the mapping of ideas and concepts. By the end of this session participants will have developed a basic awareness of Mind Mapping and related techniques (such as Concept Mapping, Idea Mapping, etc.) and their pertinence in research contexts.

This session will:

Introduce participants to the principles of orthodox mind mapping as defined by Tony Buzan, in Use Your Head (London: BBC, 1974), and later The Mind Map Book (London: BBC, 1993).

Give the opportunity to experiment with mind mapping techniques through a practical exercise.

Review other visual mapping techniques which have evolved from orthodox mind mapping (other forms of mind mapping, concept mapping, idea mapping, argument mapping).

Highlight the effectiveness of visual mapping techniques through the presentation of a number of examples of maps.

Show how researchers can fruitfully use a visual map as a thinking space, both individually and collaboratively.

Discuss the potential of visual mapping for remote collaboration, through web-based applications.

Provide a review of the most pertinent software available both as desktop applications and as online applications.

Workshop on Mind Mapping, 16 December 2010

The Salford Method group has invited me to give a presentation on Mind-Mapping on 16 December 2010: To book a place, click here

Mind mapping
Thursday 16 December 2010, 10:00-11:30
Think Lab, 7th Floor Maxwel Building, The University of Salford

The aim of this session is to introduce participants to the principles and practice of the mapping of ideas and concepts. By the end of this session participants will have developed a basic awareness of Mind Mapping and related techniques (such as Concept Mapping, Idea Mapping, etc.) and their pertinence in research contexts.

This session will:

Introduce participants to the principles of orthodox mind mapping as defined by Tony Buzan, in Use Your Head (London: BBC, 1974), and later The Mind Map Book (London: BBC, 1993).

Give the opportunity to experiment with mind mapping techniques through a practical exercise.

Review other visual mapping techniques which have evolved from orthodox mind mapping (other forms of mind mapping, concept mapping, idea mapping, argument mapping).

Highlight the effectiveness of visual mapping techniques through the presentation of a number of examples of maps.

Show how researchers can fruitfully use a visual map as a thinking space, both individually and collaboratively.

Discuss the potential of visual mapping for remote collaboration, through web-based applications.

Provide a review of the most pertinent software available both as desktop applications and as online applications.

Understanding Open Media for Research Workshop, 13 October 2010

My colleague Cristina Costa (aka @cristinacost on Twitter), Research Technologies Development Officer, at the Research and Graduate College, and I will be facilitating a workshop on Understanding Open Media for Research, on the Salford Postgraduate Research Training Programme (SPoRT) at the University of Salford on 13 October 2010, 14:00 – 16:00.

Understanding Open Media for Research

Cristina Costa, Research and Graduate College

Dr Pascal Venier, School of Languages

Wednesday 13 October 2010, 14:00 – 16:00

This is a discussion based session, which will seek to engage participants in relevant debates regarding the use of the participatory web (social media) for collaboration and dissemination of research. The session will start with a 10 minute presentation by the session leaders on the current use of Social Media in a research context and will be followed by participant-led discussions.

The goals of the session are to:

  • share examples of how researchers are using social media to collaborate and disseminate research
  • Introduce the concepts and practices of open research and open communication
  • foster understanding regarding the use of web technologies in research contexts
  • discuss which types of web based tools researchers use
  • reflect on the benefits and implications of using social media in a research context